Hach 96299 UniVer 3 Hardness Reagent Powder Pillows, pk/100

Product Number:

Price: $0.00

Product Description:

Combined indicator/buffer for total hardness determination by titration. For use with total hardness test kits. Pack of 100 Powder Pillows.

Product # Shp. Wt. $ Each
96299 0.3 lbs 19.99

Frequently Asked Questions:

How often should I calibrate my pH meter?

When a pH meter is used for reporting purposes, a calibration should be performed before each use. If the meter is routinely used several times per the day for process monitoring, a single calibration performed at the beginning of the day is generally sufficient.

What should I store my pH probe in when I´m not using it?

Storage of a pH electrode can affect the life of the electrode and how quickly it responds or stabilizes in different types of samples. Since the internal and external components are separated by a reference junction, a phenomenon called osmosis can occur if different molarity solutions are in contact with each other for too long, causing a drift in the internal reference. To prevent this from occurring, store the electrode in the Hach Electrode Storage Solution or a 3 M potassium chloride (KCl) solution for Hach pH electrodes. The electrode can be stored for up to 2 hours in sample (if sample pH is not extreme) or in a neutral solution such as tap water between uses to prevent drying of the reference junction, but remember the greater the difference in molarity between the sample and internal solution of the electrode, the more problems that can occur. Do not leave the electrode in deionized or distilled water for more than 15 - 30 minutes. The electrolyte or internal filling solution can become diluted due to osmosis and adversely affect the function of the electrode.

If the electrode has become dehydrated, let the probe soak in the 4, 7 and 10 buffers for 5 minutes each and repeat 2x. Then soak the electrode tip in a 3.0 M KCl storage solution for 1-2 hours and rinse with deionized water prior to use.

How often do I need to dispense the gel in my Platinum Series electrode?

Click the dispenser two or three times every day before calibration. You can then measure several samples without clicking the dispenser, unless you rinse the electrode very vigorously between samples. Click the dispenser every five to ten samples after calibration.

My pH reading is unstable and erratic. I’m using a Platinum Series Electrode. What can I do?

Most likely the electrolyte gel in the Platinum Series Electrode is not making contact with the sample or buffer, or there is an air bubble in the gel.

Click the dispenser on the electrode until the electrolyte gel comes out and the pH reading is stable. See the electrode instruction manual for more information on the electrolyte gel cartridge.

How should I clean my pH electrode

Cleaning an electrode may improve performance when the response and stabilization time become noticeably slower. For a mild cleaning, place the probe in a detergent solution such as Alconox for thirty minutes, and then soak in deionized water for approximately 15 minutes before use.

For a more vigorous cleaning, place the probe in 0.1 N HCl solution for two minutes, rinse with deionized water, place in a 0.1 N NaOH solution for two minutes, then rinse and place in the HCl solution again for two more minutes. Rinse the probe and allow to soak in deionized water for approximately 15 minutes.

To clean organic build up on the probe, place the probe in liquid bleach for five minutes, then soak in deionized water for 15 minutes.

How long can I expect my pH electrode to last?

pH electrodes typically last from 6 months to 2 years before needing replacement depending on the type of electrode (I.e. gel vs. refillable). The glass bulb of a pH electrode has an electrical resistance that naturally changes over time. When this resistance gets too high, the electrode may not function properly and the meter will not accept calibrations or measurements.

My sensION pH meter shows 7.00 and won´t change when trying to calibrate or measure. It also shows error 2 or 3 when I´m trying to calibrate. What can I do?

This can happen when using an electrode with a 5-pin connector. Press the Setup key and be sure the display shows 5-pin and not BNC. If the display shows BNC, press the Enter key to change it to 5-pin. The meter will accept electrodes with either the 5-pin or BNC connector, but you must select which one is being used in the Setup mode.

If 5-pin is selected in the Setup mode and the pH values still don´t change in a different buffer, the glass bulb of the electrode is likely cracked or damaged and the entire electrode must be replaced.

How can I tell if my sensION meter needs repair?

Problems with pH measurement are usually due to a problem with the electrode, however it may be worthwhile to check the meter to be sure it is operating correctly.

This can be done by shorting out the 5-pin or BNC electrode connection on the meter and checking to see that the reading in the mV mode is 0.0 (+/- 0.1) mV.

To short out the BNC connection, screw on the BNC shorting cap. Go into the setup mode and make sure the display says BNC, then press the mV key.

To short out the 5-pin connector, use a wire or a paper clip and make sure 5-pin is selected in the setup mode. Looking at the 5-pin connector on the back of the instrument, place one end of the paper clip in the 11 o´clock pin hole and the other end against the outside ring (not the half circle) of the connector.

If the reading is not within the -0.1 to 0.1 mV range, press the Cal and Enter keys simultaneously while the connector is shorted. If the mV reading is still outside of the specified range, the meter should be sent in for service.

What buffers do I need for pH calibration?

Two buffers should be used for calibration of a pH meter or tester. If the expected pH of the sample is below 7, use pH 4 and 7 buffers. If the expected pH is above 7, use pH 7 and 10 buffers.

pH buffers come in either powder pillows or as solutions. Powder pillows have a longer shelf life and are more economical than solutions but are less convenient. Buffer solutions are very convenient but can be prone to contamination if left open.

Buffer solutions can be poured from the bottle into a small beaker, or if using Singlet Solution Packs, the electrode can be placed directly in the solution bag. Buffer powder pillows require preparation by mixing with 50-mL deionized water before each calibration.

Once used for calibration, buffer solutions should be discarded. Buffer solutions in bottles should always be poured into a beaker for calibration, and used buffer should never be poured back into the bottle.

My TDS Pocket Pal Tester will no longer calibrate, what can I do?

Be certain that the standards are fresh and you are following the calibration instructions correctly. If this is the case, and the unit will still not calibrate, it may be time to replace the unit.

I received both glass and plastic sample cells with my Pocket Colorimeter II. Which should I use?

The different sample cells correspond to different concentration ranges in the instrument. Many Pocket Colorimeters have a low and high range. For example, the Pocket Colorimeter II for Chlorine (Catalog No. 5870000) measures chlorine in a low range mode from 0.02 - 2.00 mg/L Cl2, and in a high range mode from 0.1 - 8.0 mg/L Cl2. The step-by-step procedure is different for the low vs. high range.

Glass sample cells should be used when measuring in the low range mode, and plastic cells should be used when measuring in the high range mode. If using the Pocket Colorimeter II for pH and Chlorine, use the glass sample cells when measuring pH and the plastic cells when measuring chlorine.

The plastic cells have a shorter pathlength, and the calibration is different when glass vs. plastic cells are used. If a glass cell is used for a range that is calibrated with a plastic sample cell, the readings will be erroneously high.

Note that the plastic cell used with older model Pocket Colorimeters will not fit correctly in the Pocket Colorimeter II. Use Catalog No. 4864302 with the Pocket Colorimeter II and 4165802 with older (blue) Pocket Colorimeters.

When I test the sample in my Pocket II Colorimeter using the high range I get one reading, and then I test the same sample on the low range and get a totally different reading. Why?

The procedure is different for the 2 ranges; make sure you are following the correct procedure for the range you are using. The high range uses more reagent than the low range. The high range also uses a plastic sample cell instead of the glass cell used for the low range.

How do I know if my chlorine result is correct?

If you are using a Hach instrument such as a colorimeter or spectrophotometer, follow the accuracy check section in the step-by-step procedure. This will verify that your instrument and reagents are working properly and that you are performing the test correctly.

Hach also carries SpecCheck Secondary Chlorine Standards, Catalog No. 2635300, to verify instrument performance. This is a very simple and quick way to determine that your instrument is functioning properly.

If your procedure does not have an accuracy check section, you can use a sample of known chlorine concentration, called a chlorine standard solution, and run the test using that solution in place of your sample. If you measure the correct concentration of that solution, then you can be confident that your reagents and instrument or kit are working properly, and that you are performing the test correctly.

Hach chlorine standard solutions, Catalog No. 1426810, must be diluted using high-quality deionized water before use. Chlorine can be lost if the dilution water is not of high quality.

My colorimeter does not seem to be giving me a correct reading. What can I try before sending it in for repair?

Verify that the correct sample tube is being used. 

Verify that the same sample tube is being used for both zeroing and sample testing. 

Verify that the tube is clean and free of fingerprints and dirt. 

Verify that the tube is being positioned the same way every time. (Most colorimeters and tubes have an index that must be aligned before taking a reading.) 

Verify that the reagents are not expired. 

Verify that the batteries in the colorimeter are not low.

The results using my DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890 colorimeter do not match an outside lab's results, what can I do?

Be sure the results from the lab are reported in the same chemical form that is displayed on the colorimeter, because different conversions are used for the different forms.

For instance, if the outside lab reports results for nitrate as nitrogen (NO3-N), be sure the instrument display shows NO3-N and not NO3. Results reported as NO3 will be 4.4 times the result as NO3-N due to the weight difference between nitrate and nitrogen. Press the CONC key to change the displayed form.

Phosphorus is another common parameter where labs commonly report results as P, but the default form on Hach instruments is as PO43-. A result as PO43- will be 3 times the result as P.

What's the difference between primary and secondary calibration standards?

Primary standards are required to perform an actual recalibration of a unit, whether it's a chlorine colorimeter or a turbidimeter. They are manufactured to an exact value (guaranteed to be accurate until their "best before" date) 

Secondary standards are used frequently as a check to see whether an instrument needs to be recalibrated with primary standards. Secondary standards are not manufactured to an exact value, but do have an important feature in that they remain stable for long periods of time. 

For instance, Hach recommends that you recalibrate your turbidimeter at least once every 3 months using a valid primary calibration standard. After you calibrate your meter using the primary standard, you place a secondary standard into the measuring chamber, take a measurement and write the measured value on the outside of the secondary standard vial. Over the course of the next few months, you can periodically place the secondary standard in the chamber and take a reading. Because secondary standards maintain a given value, the reading should match the initial reading written on the vial or at least be within the manufacturer's specified tolerance range. If the reading is outside that range, the instrument requires calibration using a primary standard.

Can I use a colorimeter or spectrophotometer to measure turbidity?

Turbidity can also be approximated in an instrument such as a colorimeter or spectrophotometer by measuring the decrease in transmitted light due to turbidity in the sample. This type of measurement, however, is not considered valid by regulatory agencies and does not fit the definition of turbidity by the American Public Health Association.

Transmittance measurements are also susceptible to interferences such as light absorption from color or particle absorption. What´s more, there is no correlation that can be made between transmittance measurements (reported as FAU) versus measurements from a turbidimeter (reported as NTU). Nevertheless, colorimeters and spectrophotometers are sometimes used for determining large changes in the turbidity of a water system or for process control.

Any true turbidity measurement must be made in a turbidimeter. Hach Company has been designing and manufacturing turbidimeters for more than 50 years, and has a great deal of expertise in this area.

Why does my CL17 chlorine analyzer always read zero, or very low concentrations?

Most likely the flow rate is too low or too high. The optimal flow rate through the colorimeter is 270-300 mL/min.

If the flow rate is too low, color from the previous sample will not be flushed from the colorimeter when the instrument takes the zero measurement for the next reading. The instrument will not see a color difference between the zero and read measurements, and therefore display a zero reading.

If the flow rate is too high, the color that forms in the sample will be flushed from the colorimeter before the analyzer can measure it.

My CL17 chlorine analyzer has the correct flow but is still reading zero, what are the other possible problems?

If the flow rate going through the colorimeter is between 270-300 mL/min, but the instrument reads zero, there are various possible causes:

  • Old tubing
  • Grooves worn on the back side of the peristaltic pump blocks
  • Loose pressure plate on the peristaltic pump
  • Bad photocell, lamp, and/or interference filter
  • A chlorine level well above the analyzer maximum of 5 mg/L. In this case the high level of chlorine will bleach the pink color, turning it clear and causing a zero reading.
  • DPD powder not added to the bottle of Indicator Solution
My CL17 chlorine analyzer is reading correctly, but the pumps are not turning on.

Check to make sure the relays are working correctly by pressing 918 DIAG. Then check the set points and make sure that the alarm is set to LOW and not HIGH.

Our CL17 chlorine analyzer display shows "Sensor Warning". How can we find out what the problem is and what the corrective measures are?

This message indicates that the analyzer has detected something wrong using its internal diagnostics. To see what the error is, push the menu key. Push the down arrow key until you reach the alarm menu, then press enter. Press the down arrow until recall is displayed, then press enter. An error message will be displayed. Look in the instrument manual to find the error message and corresponding correction.

Does the CL17 Chlorine Analyzer measure free and total chlorine?

Yes, the CL17 measures either free or total chlorine depending on which reagent set is installed in the instrument. The CL17 will not measure both parameters at the same time, however.

Can I change my CL17 Chlorine Analyzer for free chlorine to measure total chlorine and vice versa?

Yes. You will need to install the reagents for either free or total chlorine, and ideally change the reagent tubing.

If the analyzer is due for its annual maintenance, change all the tubing and install the new reagents.

If the analyzer is not due for maintenence, thoroughly flush the lines with deionized water. Then install the new reagents.

My CL17 Chlorine Analyzer buffer solution is brown, what is wrong?

If the DPD Indicator Powder is mistakenly added to the Buffer Solution, rather than the Indicator Solution, it will turn the Buffer Solution a turbid brown color. If this happens, the buffer must be replaced.

What should the color of the reagents for the CL-17 Chlorine Analyzer be?

The Buffer Solution should be clear and colorless. The Indicator Solution, after the DPD powder is added, can vary in color from clear to dark read. The color will vary from lot to lot, but this does not indicate a quality problem, and it will not affect your chlorine results.

My CL17 Chlorine Analyzer came with two extra reagent bottles. What are they for?

In addition to the normal reagent set, the analyzer comes with two bottles of chemicals. One is a small 100 ml dropper bottle of 19.2 N sulfuric acid (Catalog No. 203832). This solution is used for cleaning the analyzers. Instructions for using this solution are in the maintenance section of the instrument manual.

The other reagent is a 29 ml bottle of 0.250 N ferrous ammonium sulfate (Catalog No. 181133). This solution is used to create a zero standard for calibrating the instrument if needed. Instructions for using this solution are located in the calibration section of the instrument manual.

Can I use the LDO probe with my SensIon6, SensIon8, SensIon156, or SensIon378 meter?

The LDO probes for dissolved oxygen require electronics and software that are not compatible with the SensIon meters. You will need an HQ10 or HQ20 meter to use with the portable LDO probes.

Can I use the docking station from my SensIon6 or SensIon156 meter with my HQ10 or HQ20 dissolved oxygen meter?

The docking station used with the SensIon meters is not compatible with the HQ10 or HQ20 dissolved oxygen meters. Use the LDO docking station (Cat. No. 5183001 or 5183002) with the HQ10 or HQ20 meter.

The docking station allows you to connect the meter to AC power. It also allows you to connect the meter to a computer using an RS232 cable (Cat. No. 4812900). The RS232 cable is not included with the LDO docking station.

How do I clean the sensor on my dissolved oxygen LDO probe?

Wipe the probe with a soft, wet cloth to remove deposits. For stubborn deposits, use a dilute detergent solution, rinse well, and soak in tap water for approximately 10 minutes.

Do not use alcohol, organic solvents or abrasives. These will destroy the sensor.

My dissolved oxygen reading using the LDO probe with the HQ10 or HQ20 meter is significantly higher than my reading from the SensIon meter, why is this?

This is generally seen at dissolved oxygen concentrations greater than 5 mg/L. The reasons for this difference are complex, but are due to lower than actual readings from traditional probes that use gas-permeable membranes.

Membrane probes consume oxygen at the electrode surface, and therefore oxygen from the sample must continually go through the membrane to replenish the oxygen consumed. This is why stirring is important with this type of probe.

The more oxygen in the sample, the more oxygen must go through the membrane. At high concentrations (greater than 5 mg/L O2), these probes consume more oxygen than can be transported through the membrane, resulting in a depletion at the electrode surface.

In contrast, the LDO probe does not have a membrane and does not consume oxygen. An equilibrium between oxygen in the sample and oxygen in the sensor film on the sensor cap is easily maintained, and does not require stirring.

What is the difference between Continuous Read mode and Push to Read mode on the HQ10 or HQ20 dissolved oxygen meter? Which mode should I use?

During Push to Read mode, a measurement is taken only when the Read key is pressed. This is the default meter setting, and it minimizes power consumption and prolongs battery life.

During Continuous Read mode, a measurement is taken twice per second, requiring continuous power. The meter will operate in continuous read mode for 12-hours on fresh batteries (86,400 measurements), and is useful when you need to continuously monitor a process.

Can I manually calibrate the LDO probe/HQ10 or HQ20 meter rather than using the calibration module?

No, the calibration module that accompanies replacement sensor caps or probes is used to update the software with complex data specific to the LDO sensor cap. Once the cap or probe is installed and the software updated with the calibration module, no other calibration is necessary.

However, if desired, an additional manual calibration using a dissolved oxygen standard or water-saturated air can be completed.

How long does it take the portable LDO dissolved oxygen probe or sensor to polarize?

No polarization time is needed for the LDO probe.

Why do other dissolved oxygen probes require sample stirring, but the LDO probe does not?

Other dissolved oxygen probes consume oxygen during measurement, which depletes the oxygen at the electrode surface. The sample must be stirred to replenish this oxygen, or else the probe will detect lower and lower concentrations and give inaccurate results.

In contrast, the LDO probe does not consume oxygen. An equilibrium between oxygen in the sample and oxygen at the sensor surface is easily maintained without stirring.

How often do I need to replace the sensor cap on my LDO dissolved oxygen probe?

The LDO sensor cap should be replaced once a year.

How do I change the sensor cap on the portable LDO dissolved oxygen probe?

Sensor cap replacement on the LDO probe is required annually or whenever the cap has been damaged or fouled. To remove the shroud, hold the shroud and unscrew the collar. Pull the shroud off of the probe body, then remove the collar.

Dry the sensor cap thoroughly before removing. Unscrew the sensor cap and quickly screw the new sensor cap onto the probe (be sure the new cap is completely dry). Be careful not to touch the optics inside the probe.

Select "O2 setup" in the HQ10 or HQ20 meter setup menu, and update the meter using the module that comes with the new sensor cap (see section 3.2.4 in the instrument manual).

The update module is used to update the meter with data specific to the LDO sensor cap. Once the cap is installed and the meter updated with the module, the probe is ready for use. No stabilization time or calibration is necessary.

How do measure Absorbance or %T with the DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890 Colorimeter?

Enter the first two numbers of the wavelength you wish to use as the program number. Then press the ABS %T key to change between absorbance and % transmittance.

For example, the DR/820 Colorimeter has one color filter with a wavelength of 520 nm. Press PRGM, then 52 and ENTER to measure absorbance with this instrument.

The DR/850 Colorimeter has two filters with wavelengths of 520 nm and 610 nm. Press PRGM, then 52 to measure absorbance at 520 nm, or 61 to measure absorbance at 610 nm.

The DR/890 Colorimeter has wavelengths of 420, 520, 560, and 610 nm. Press PRGM, then 42, 52, 56, or 61 to measure absorbance at 420, 520, 560, or 610 nm with this instrument.

The word LIMIT is flashing on my DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890 Colorimeter. What does this mean?

A flashing LIMIT indicates that the measured concentration is outside of the specified range that the instrument can display.

If the display shows a number such as 2.20 when LIMIT is flashing, this means the concentration of your sample exceeds the range for your test. Start with a fresh sample, dilute it with deionized water, and repeat the test. If LIMIT flashes again, you will need to start over with a larger dilution. If LIMIT does not appear, multiply the displayed concentration by the dilution factor to find the concentration of your sample before dilution.

If the display shows 0, 0.0, or 0.00 when LIMIT is flashing, this means the instrument is seeing the sample as less concentrated than the blank. There may several possibilities why this might happen:

  1. The concentration of the sample is zero or below the detection limit of the instrument. If this is the case, the instrument may be reading slightly below zero relative to the blank, but within the +/- 0.005 absorbance units specified for the instrument. If possible, use the same sample cell for the blank and the sample. This minimizes any measured differences due to optical differences between the cells.
  2. A Reagent Blank Correction was entered into the instrument, and the measured concentration is less than the reagent blank value. The instrument subtracts the reagent blank value from each measured concentration.
  3. There is turbidity in the sample that dissolves or paritally dissolves after adding the reagents. In this case the instrument is measuring a decrease in turbidity rather than a change in concentration. Either filter the sample, or adjust the pH of the blank so it is the same as the sample after reagents are added.
  4. There is color in the sample that changes with a change in pH after the reagents are added. Adjust the pH of the blank so it is the same as the sample after reagents are added.
  5. The instrument was zeroed with the blank when it should have been zeroed with the sample. Some procedures, such as for ozone, may instruct you to zero on the sample and measure the blank. This is opposite from most procedures. Check your procedure to be sure you are following it correctly.
My DR/800 colorimeter will not power on when I press the on/off button, what should I do?

Try replacing the batteries with new alkaline batteries, and make sure the batteries are installed in the proper orientation. If this does not help, it is likely that the keypad is not functioning properly, and the instrument should be sent in for repair.

The results using my DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890 colorimeter do not match an outside lab's results, what can I do?

Be sure the results from the lab are reported in the same chemical form that is displayed on the colorimeter, because different conversions are used for the different forms.

For instance, if the outside lab reports results for nitrate as nitrogen (NO3-N), be sure the instrument display shows NO3-N and not NO3. Results reported as NO3 will be 4.4 times the result as NO3-N due to the weight difference between nitrate and nitrogen. Press the CONC key to change the displayed form.

Phosphorus is another common parameter where labs commonly report results as P, but the default form on Hach instruments is as PO43-. A result as PO43- will be 3 times the result as P

What does Standard Adjust mean in the DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890 Colorimeter procedures? Should I use it?

Standard Adjust is a feature that uses a standard solution to slightly adjust the factory calibration in the instrument software. For example, if a DR/890 instrument displayed 0.96 mg/L when a 1.00 mg/L standard solution were placed in the instrument, the Standard Adjust feature would make the instrument display 1.00 mg/L.

Calibration of the instrument at the factory is very accurate, however some methods have more variability due to user technique and reagent variability. Standard adjust is recommended for those methods, such as nitrate and sulfate, for the best accuracy.

Limits are programmed into the instrument to reject adjustments that are too far from the measured value. Typical limits for standard adjustment are 10-20%, but can be more depending on the method. These limits ensure that if a standard solution were prepared incorrectly, the instrument would reject the adjustment.

For example, if a 1.00 mg/L standard solution were placed in the instrument, and the displayed value were 0.77 mg/L, the instrument would likely not allow you to force it to read 1.00, because that would change the concentration by more than 20%. If this happens, prepare a fresh standard solution and make sure you are following the procedure correctly. Note that the standard solution must first be mixed with reagents and any reaction time must be observed as specified in the procedure.

What is the difference between Standard Adjust and User Calibration?

Standard Adjust multiplies the factory calibration curve by a factor that is based on the difference between a standard solution concentration and the displayed concentration. Typical limits for calibration curve adjustment are 10-20%. These limits ensure that if a standard solution were prepared incorrectly, the instrument would reject the adjustment.

User calibration puts an entirely new calibration curve into the instrument and does not have rejection limits if standards are prepared incorrectly. User calibration is not recommended for this reason, however local regulations may require you to do this.

I'm following the instructions for Adjusting the Standard Curve but the instrument will not accept the concentration I am entering. What is wrong?

Most likely the adjustment is outside the acceptable limits for the program you are using. Limits are programmed into the instrument to reject adjustments that are unreasonably far from the measured value. For example, if a 1.00 mg/L standard solution were placed in the instrument, and the displayed value were 0.77 mg/L, the instrument may not allow you to force it to read 1.00, because that would change the concentration by more than 20%.

Typical limits for standard adjustment are 10-20%, but can be more depending on the method. These limits ensure that if a standard solution were prepared incorrectly, the instrument would reject the adjustment.

If this happens, prepare a fresh standard solution and make sure you are following the procedure correctly. Note that the standard solution must first be mixed with reagents and any reaction time must be observed as specified in the procedure.

How can I find what wavelength a method uses on the DR/820, DR/850, or DR/890?

The following table lists the wavelengths used in the DR/890 Colorimeter instrument. The DR/890 Colorimeter uses four different wavelengths: 420, 520, 560, and 610 nm. Note the DR/820 uses only the 520 nm wavelength, and the DR/850 uses only 520 and 610 nm wavelengths.

Parameter

Program Number

Wavelength (nm)

Aluminum (Aluminon)

1

520

Aluminum

User

610

Benzotriazole

3

420

Boron, LR

4

420

Bromine

5

520

Bromine (AV)

6

520

Cadmium

User

560

Chloramine, Mono, LR

110

610

Chlorine, Free

9

520

Chlorine, Free (AV)

11

520

Chlorine, Free (TNT)

10

520

Chlorine, Free, HR

8

520

Chlorine, Free, HR+

12

520

Chlorine, Total

9

520

Chlorine, Total (AV)

11

520

Chlorine, Total (TNT)

10

520

Chlorine, Total, HR

8

520

Chlorine, Total, HR+

12

520

Chlorine Dioxide (DPD)

112

520

Chlorine Dioxide (DPD, AV)

113

520

Chlorine Dioxide, MR (Direct read)

7

420

Chromium, Hexavalent

13

560

Chromium, Hexavalent (AV)

14

560

Chromium, Total

15

560

Chromium

User

520

COD, LR

16

420

COD, HR

17

610

COD, HR+

17

610

COD, Mn III

18

520

Color, True and Apparent

19

420

Copper (Bicinchoninate)

20

560

Copper (Bicinchoninate, AV)

20

560

Copper (Porphyrin)

22

420

Copper

User

420

Cyanide

23

610

Cyanide (Europe Only)

User

560

Cyanuric Acid

24

520

DEHA

25

560

Fluoride

27

610

Fluoride (AV)

28

610

Hardness, Ca

29

520

Hardness, Mg

30

520

Hydrazine

31

420

Hydrazine (AV)

32

420

Iron, Ferrous

33

520

Iron, Ferrous (AV)

33

520

Iron, Total (FerroVer)

33

520

Iron, Total (FerroVer, AV)

33

520

Iron, Total (FerroMo)

38

610

Iron, Total (FerroZine)

37

560

Iron, Total (TPTZ)

39

610

Iron, Total (TPTZ, AV)

39

610

Iron

User

520

Lead

User

520

Manganese, LR

43

560

Manganese, HR

41

520

Molybdenum, HR

44

420

Molybdenum, HR (AV)

44

420

Molybdenum, LR

47

610

Nickel (PAN)

48

560

Nickel

User

520

Nitrate, LR

55

520

Nitrate, MR

54

420

Nitrate, MR (AV)

53

420

Nitrate, HR

51

520

Nitrate, HR (AV)

50

520

Nitrate, HR (TNT)

57

420

Nitrite, LR

60

520

Nitrite, LR (AV)

62

520

Nitrite, LR (TNT)

63

520

Nitrite, HR

59

560

Nitrite (Europe Only)

User

520

Nitrogen, Ammonia, LR

64

610

Nitrogen, Ammonia, LR (TNT)

66

610

Nitrogen, Ammonia, LR

User

610

Nitrogen, Ammonia, HR (TNT)

67

610

Nitrogen, Ammonia, HR

User

610

Nitrogen, Total, LR (TNT)

58

420

Nitrogen, Total HR (TNT)

69

420

Nitrogen, Total Inorganic (TNT)

68

610

Nitrogen, Total Kjeldahl

65

420

Oxygen, Dissolved, LR

71

610

Oxygen, Dissolved, HR

70

520

Ozone, LR

72

610

Ozone, MR

73

610

Ozone, HR

74

610

pH

75

520

Phosphonates

80

610

Phosphorus, Acid Hydrolyzable (TNT)

82

610

Phosphorus, Reactive (PhosVer3)

79

610

Phosphorus, Reactive (PhosVer3, AV)

79

610

Phosphorus, Reactive, LR (TNT)

82

610

Phosphorus, Reactive (Amino Acid)

85

520

Phosphorus, Reactive, HR

77

420

Phosphorus, Reactive, HR (AV)

78

420

Phosphorus, Reactive, HR (TNT)

86

420

Phosphorus, Reactive, LR

User

610

Phosphorus, Reactive, HR

User

610

Phosphorus, Total LR (TNT)

82

610

Phosphorus, Total HR (TNT)

87

420

Phosphorus, Total, LR

User

610

Phosphorus, Total, HR

User

610

Silica, LR

90

610

Silica, HR

89

420

Silica, UHR

88

420

Sulfate

91

520

Sulfate (AV)

92

520

Sulfate

User

420

Sulfide

93

610

Surfactants

26

610

Suspended Solids

94

610

Tannin and Lignin

98

610

TOC, LR

116

610

TOC, MR

117

610

TOC, HR

115

610

ToxTrak

61

610

Turbidity

95

520

Volatile Acids

96

520

Zinc

97

610

Zinc (Europe Only)

User

520

How much deionized water needs to be mixed with a pH buffer powder pillow?

Add 50 mL of deionized or distilled water to a small beaker and add the contents of one buffer powder pillow. Mix thoroughly until all powder is dissolved. Discard the solution after calibration.

What should I do if my pH meter won't calibrate?

If instructions are closely followed but the meter will not accept the calibration, most likely the problem is with the electrode. You can check whether the electrode is still good by measuring the mV reading of the electrode in the pH buffers.

Place the electrode in a pH 7 buffer solution and press the mV key to show the mV reading. The meter should read between -30 and 30 mV. The mV reading in the pH 7 buffer is called the offset. If the offset is outside of this range, try cleaning the electrode, and replace the gel cartridge or filling solution. Also make sure you are using a fresh buffer solution. If the mV reading is still outside of this range, the electrode needs to be replaced.

If the mV reading is within this range, check the reading of the electrode in the pH 4 or 10 buffer. The reading in the 4 buffer should increase by 174 (+/- 9) mV or anywhere from 165-183 mV, and the reading in the 10 buffer should decrease by 174 (+/- 9) mV.

For example, if the reading in the pH 7 buffer is 2 mV and the reading in the pH 10 buffer is -180 mV, the reading decreased by 182 mV, which is within the specified range. If the difference in mV between the pH 7 and or 10 buffer is outside of the specified range, try cleaning the electrode, and replace the gel cartridge or filling solution. Also make sure you are using fresh buffer solutions. If the mV reading is still outside of this range, the electrode needs to be replaced.

If the offset of the electrode and the difference between the offset and mV reading in a pH 4 or 7 buffer is within the specified range, the calibration problem is not due to the electrode. Carefully review the calibration procedure to be sure that the instructions are being followed exactly.

I just received a Pocket Colorimeter II for pH and Chlorine (Catalog No. 5870012). The procedure says to use 5-mL of sample but I received DPD reagent for 25-mL of sample. Is this a mistake?

The procedure is correct. Add 5 mL sample to the plastic 1-cm/10-mL sample cell, and add the DPD reagent for 25-mL of sample.

The DPD reagent was originally formulated to measure a lower range of chlorine. The ratio of 25-mL DPD reagent to 5-mL sample allows the range on this instrument to extend to 10.0 mg/L Cl2.The reagent inside a 5-mL and a 25-mL DPD powder pillow differs only in the amount (weight fill) of reagent inside the pillow.

My Pocket II Colorimeter turns off by itself. Is this normal?

Yes, the instrument will automatically turn off if not used for 15 minutes. This feature conserves battery usage. If entering a calibration in the User-Entered Calibration mode, the automatic shut-off is 60 minutes to allow time for standard preparation and measurement.

I get very different readings for chlorine when I put the same sample cell in the Pocket II Colorimeter for chlorine vs. the pocket colorimeter for pH and chlorine. Why is this?

The glass and plastic sample cells that come with each colorimeter are not interchangeable. The glass sample cells that come with the Chlorine Pocket II Colorimeter (Catalog No. 5870000) cannot be placed in the Chlorine & pH Pocket II Colorimeter (Catalog No. 5870012) to compare results.

When using the low range (0 - 2.00 mg/L Cl2) of the chlorine colorimeter, you must use the glass cells. To compare results to the pH & chlorine coloirmeter, transfer both the blank and reacted sample to the plastic sample cells. Results between the two instruments should be similar when the correct sample cells are used.

If you are using the high range (0 - 8.0 mg/L Cl2) of the chlorine colorimeter, you must use the plastic sample cells. In this case you can place the same sample cells directly into the pH & chlorine colorimeter. Results between the two instruments should be similar.

The glass sample cells that come with the Chlorine & pH colorimeter can only be used for measuring pH.

How do I store data with the Pocket Colorimeter II?

The 10 most recent data points are stored automatically on a first in, first out basis, and can be recalled at a later time. Data cannot be downloaded to a computer; it must be recalled manually.

To recall data, press the MENU key, then press the ZERO/SCROLL key until the display shows RCL. Then press the READ/ENTER key to view the stored measurements.

What is the lowest level I can measure with the Pocket Colorimeter II?

Detection limits for each parameter can be found in the Method Performance section of the instrument manual. The detection limits are determined using the concentration at 0.010 absorbance.

The display on my Pocket II Colorimeter flashes 0, 0.0, or 0.00 when I try to measure a sample. What does this mean?

Most likely the concentration in your sample is zero, or below the detection limit of the instrument. Use a lower range method if one is available. At very low concentrations, any optical differences in the sample cells become significant. Try using one sample cell for both zeroing the instrument and reading the sample to minimize these optical differences.

The display on my Pocket II Colorimeter shows a flashing square. What does this mean?

The flashing square indicates that the instrument needs to be zeroed before it can take a measurement. Place a sample cell containing your blank solution into the instrument and press the zero key.

The manual for my Pocket Colorimeter II includes several parameters; can I measure all of these parameters with this instrument?

The instruction manual may include other parameters that can be measured at the same wavelength as your instrument, however each Pocket Colorimeter II is calibrated to measure only one parameter.

It may be possible to add a user calibration to measure one other parameter using reagents for that parameter, however it requires that the additional parameter be one of the ones in the same procedure manual, and that the range not exceed that for which the instrument is calibrated. The instrument will overrange at the upper limit given for that particular instrument. For instance, if the instrument overranges at 3.30 mg/L, a user calibration will also overrange at 3.30 mg/L.

The 2100P Turbidimeter doesn't read my samples, it only displays a flashing "9.99" or "99.9". What can I do?

A flashing 9.99 or 99.9 indicates that the instrument is in the Manual Range mode and the sample turbidity is above the selected range. There are three Manual Ranges that display either two, one, or no decimal places: 0.00 - 9.99, 10.0 - 99.9, and 100 - 1000 NTU. If the 0 - 9.99 range is selected and the sample turbidity is greater than 9.99, the display will flash 9.99.

When Automatic Range is selected, the number of decimal places changes automatically with the measured turbidity of the sample. Flashing 9's will not appear. To select Automatic Range, press the range key until AUTO RNG appears in the display. The display will stop flashing and show the turbidity of the sample.

Is there a way to reset the 2100P Turbidimeter (Catalog No. 465000) so that it uses the factory settings?

Yes. Restoring the factory settings can be helpful if the instrument was calibrated incorrectly, or if the instrument appears to display values that are significantly far from what is expected.

To restore the factory settings and calibration, follow the steps below:

  1. Turn the instrument off.
  2. Press and hold the DIAG key as you turn the instrument on.
  3. Release DIAG when the software version (a number such as 1.3) disappears from the display. (For models with serial number less than 920300000800, 2100 disappears). CAL? will appear and continue to flash until a user-entered calibration is successfully completed.

This procedure clears any user-entered calibration from memory, and is equivalent to a cold start used on other instruments. The 2100P will then use the factory calibration for measurement. If the reset corrects the problem, calibrate the instrument with StablCal Standards to remove the CAL? from the display.

If the reset does not correct the problem, try replacing the lamp (Catalog No. 4653900). The lamp may become weak over time and fluctuate in intensity, resulting in poor reproducibility and poor accuracy.

There are no related products.